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Linux.com
Is RHN the right choice for your business?
Editor's note: Ahmad Baitalmal is the VP of IT for Etelos Systems, Inc., which is located in Issaquah, Washington. This commentary explains how and why RHN is not well-suited to his firm's needs. It was a misty evening in Issaquah, WA, some time ago. With a brand new RedHat 7.2 installation, I had just finished moving our flagship product from an MS VB/SQL/ASP setup to PHP/PostgreSQL. The euphoria was rampant as we saw how quickly our slow pages were loading on our new platform. "Move us over dude!" said our CEO, referring to the company's mail server. The Mail move went smoothly as we left Exchange for Postfix. Everybody was set up and happy. We were dancing the victory dance, unaware of the mess that lay ahead.

GCC status update
After checking out the GCC-CVS code I had some unresolved questions. I was able to get in touch with Mark Mitchell, GCC's release manager, to learn some of the answers. A new C++ parser went into GCC a while ago and I had wanted to test whether there were noticable (or any) differences in speed. Mark reported he doesn't think it is notably slower than the previous implementation, but speed was not the initial implementation goal, correctness was. Some speed-up-related code has been committed and there is always more to be done in that department.

Linux Advisory Watch - December 26, 2003
This week, advisories were released for ethereal, XFree86, BIND, and apache. The distributors include Fedora, Mandrake, NetBSD, and Red Hat.

Washington Post explains why I give my stepdaughters Linux computers
I've written before about why Linux is the best operating system to give on a "gift" computer to a friend or family member who is light on technical expertise. Now Washington Post tech columnist Rob Pegoraro has written a column about poor computer company tech support (warning: taking an annoying survey may be required to read the article) that confirms my opinion.

Cross-platform Make
In an article about the GNU Build System I discussed how the Automake and Autoconf programs can be used to make your application more portable. Another tool capable of doing the same job is a program called CMake, the cross-platform, open-source make system. If you have not done so already, read the Autotools vs. CMake article in which Andy Cedilnik answers a few questions I put to him.

Slashdot

Windows CE.NET Ported to Xbox
Cutriss writes "Caught this over at Xbox Scene - Windows CE.NET 4.2 has been ported to the Xbox. Artifex, one of the developers of this project, says the ...

Tim Berners-Lee Attains Knighthood
sandalwood writes "Tim Berners-Lee has been promoted to Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire for coming up with that 'intarweb' thing we all ...

Alan Ralsky Gripes About Can Spam Act
fdiskne1 writes "The New York Times has an interview with Alan Ralsky, commonly known as the world's worst spammer. CNet News.com is running the same ...

Earth Travel On Time, Again
burgburgburg writes "The NY Times has an interesting article about a rather puzzling phenomena: for the fifth year in a row, the Earth's travel through space ...

Pushing P4 to 5.25GHz with Liquid Nitrogen
SkywalkerOS8 writes "The folks at Tom's Hardware have an article up about their attempt to overclock a Pentium 4 over 5 GHz using liquid nitrogen as cooling. A ...

PDA Speech Translator
jlowery writes "Not quite as good as a babelfish, but a PDA that does translation is probably better than resorting to hand gestures alone. I could see this as ...

Wind Turbines Kill a Few Birds
Guppy06 writes "The Houston Chronicle has an article about how a 7000-turbine windfarm in Altamont Pass, California (the world's largest collection) has killed ...

Getting Over the Stigma of a Previous Job?
Subm asks: "Some friends-of-friends worked at a company with such a high profile downfall their past employer became a liability. They weren't involved in ...

Secure Programmer: Keep an Eye on Inputs
An anonymous reader writes "This article discusses various ways data gets into your program, emphasizing how to deal appropriately with them; you might not ...

Shatner to Record Another Album
s20451 writes "Slashdotters may remember Canadian actor William Shatner from such hit TV shows as T. J. Hooker and Rescue 911; he was also known to dabble in ...

freshmeat.net

Animal Shelter Manager 1.30 BETA (Development)
Animal Shelter Manager is a complete computer solution for animal sanctuaries, rescue shelters, and veterinary surgery clinics. It features complete animal and owner management, document generation, flexible reporting, charts, Internet Web site publishing, and more.

apt4rpm 0.66.0 (Stable)
The superb Debian package installer APT has since some time become available for RPM-based distributions. However, to install RPM packages with apt, an apt repository is needed. apt4rpm creates the apt repository from an RPM repository. The rpm repository can be located locally or remotely. Once the apt repository has been created with apt4rpm, the apt tools can be used to install RPMs.

Borges Documents Management System 0.11.1
Borges is an open-source project aimed at XML-aware documentation projects which care about internationalisation, reusable contents, teamwork, etc. The system currently support the DocBook DTD.

Botan 1.3.8 (Development)
Botan is a library of cryptographic algorithms written in C++. It includes a wide selection of block and stream ciphers, public key algorithms, hash functions, and message authentication codes. It has an easy-to-use filter interface and supports many common industry standards, including X.509v3.

BugPort 1.085
The BugPort system is a Web-based system to manage tasks and defects throughout the software development process. It is written with the PHP language, using its object-oriented capabilities, and is in use by INCOGEN for internal management of software development and QA.

CleanIce 1.2.8
CleanIce is a simplistic, semi-flat theme engine for GTK+ 2.x, based on the ThinIce and Clean engines of old. The GTK+ 2.x engine has many benefits over the original theme. The arrows are more consistent, the colors are slightly revised to be more usable, etc.

convmv 1.07
convmv converts filenames (not file content), directories, and even whole filesystems to a different encoding. This comes in very handy if, for example, one switches from an 8-bit locale to an UTF-8 locale. It has some smart features: it automagically recognises if a file is already UTF-8 encoded (thus partly converted filesystems can be fully moved to UTF-8) and it also takes care of symlinks. Additionally, it is able to convert from normalization form C (UTF-8 NFC) to NFD and vice-versa. This is important for interoperability with Mac OS X, for example, which uses NFD, while Linux and most other Unixes use NFC. Though it's primary written to convert from/to UTF-8 it can also be used with almost any other charset encoding. Note that this is a command line tool which requires at least Perl version 5.8.0.

Eternal Lands 0.9.3b
Eternal Lands is a multiplatform (Windows/Linux) 3D isometric MMORPG. It requires a hardware-accelerated video card that supports at least OpenGL 1.2.

Fachwerk 0.06
Fachwerk calculates strut-and-tie models used by structural engineers for analysing and designing reinforced concrete structures. The program only uses the equilibrium conditions, thus it is not assuming elastic behaviour.

Fear LPC Mudlib 1.0
FEAR (Forming Everyone's Addictive Reality) Game Engine is a text-based, real-time role-play oriented MUDLib for the LDmud LPC driver. It also includes several enhancement modules for other mudlib releases. The game engine was the original 2.4.5 mudlib, but it has been enhanced by combining MudOS and Amylaar mudlib directory structures, commands, daemons, and other inherits into a "load-once, use-many" architectual layout.

freshmeat.net: Releases

GPP 2.13
A generic preprocessor with customizable syntax.

PodWiki 0.6.1
PodWiki is a WikiWiki tool using POD as its markup language.

WindowLab 1.20
A small and simple window manager of novel design.

sipsak 0.8.7
A command line test tool for SIP servers and applications.

MicroLCD 0.1
An XMMS plugin for LCDproc.

mp3cleanup 0.2
A tool that tidies up MP3 filenames, ID3 tags, paths, playlists, and bitrates.

Página 0.1
A page generation abstraction tool using template objects.

Botan 1.3.8 (Development)
A C++ crypto library.

onis not irc stats 0.4.7 (Unstable)
A script to convert IRC-logs into statistics.

Firebird .NET Data Provider 1.5 Release Candidate 2
An ADO.NET Data provider for Firebird.

IT Manager's Journal

ThinkGeek: New Stock

NewsForge

2004: A year of leaps
In just a couple of days, the year of the Prime Number will end until 2011 takes its place. Every year brings changes. Here are the nine biggest ones I expect to see in 2004:

IT Investor's Journal: Can Openwave crest in market?
Openwave is currently a turnaround story with takeout potential, but the company still has a tough road ahead. At present, Openwave is operating in the wrong network space. Most wireless deployment is low-cost Wi-Fi, whereas Openwave wants to be the 2G/3G application, provision, and infrastructure provider. However, few can afford to deploy the 2G/3G licenses they've got. Read on ...

Government open source deployments you don't hear about
I know of at least a dozen goverment open source deployments I have been begged not to write about, not in the spy movie, "If I tell you I'll have to kill you!" sense, but because the people responsible for them worry that excess publicity might kill their efforts to run their agencies' computers with the most reliable and cost-effective software they can find.

McKusick on SCO's latest copyright claims
NewsForge asked longtime Unix and BSD guru Kirk McKusick, who has intimate knowledge of the original AT&T versus BSD legal battles over Unix source code in the early 1990s, to comment on SCO's recent claims of copyright infringement in Linux. McKusick says he believes Torvalds when he says he did not copy the files in question, but notes that may be not the real issue here. McKusick also questions whether the GPL license could be applied to the code even if the requisite copyright notices had appeared.

Panel sees trends in open source in 2004
BURLINGAME, Calif. -- The end of the calendar year seems a natural time to step back, take a deep breath, and check the pulse of open source development ahead of what promises to be an interesting -- and hopefully, very profitable -- 2004.

Is RHN the right choice for your business?
Editor's note: Ahmad Baitalmal is the VP of IT for Etelos Systems, Inc., which is located in Issaquah, Washington. This commentary explains how and why RHN is not well-suited to his firm's needs. - It was a misty evening in Issaquah, WA, some time ago. With a brand new RedHat 7.2 installation, I had just finished moving our flagship product from an MS VB/SQL/ASP setup to PHP/PostgreSQL. The euphoria was rampant as we saw how quickly our slow pages were loading on our new platform. "Move us over dude!" said our CEO, referring to the company's mail server. The Mail move went smoothly as we left Exchange for Postfix. Everybody was set up and happy. We were dancing the victory dance, unaware of the mess that lay ahead.

GCC status update
After checking out the GCC-CVS code I had some unresolved questions. I was able to get in touch with Mark Mitchell, GCC's release manager, to learn some of the answers. A new C++ parser went into GCC a while ago and I had wanted to test whether there were noticable (or any) differences in speed. Mark reported he doesn't think it is notably slower than the previous implementation, but speed was not the initial implementation goal, correctness was. Some speed-up-related code has been committed and there is always more to be done in that department.

Linux Advisory Watch - December 26, 2003
This week, advisories were released for ethereal, XFree86, BIND, and apache. The distributors include Fedora, Mandrake, NetBSD, and Red Hat.

IT Investor's Journal: The big picture heading into '04
I’m of the opinion that the economy/fundamentals have peaked for now and we're headed lower, hard to say if it will be muted or something more pronounced; at the margin I think it will be relatively muted. Overall market valuation looks to me to be on the high side of "OK". Going forward, I think deep cyclicals like steel will continue to perform well (in particular I love the Australian giant, BHP) but some sectors are already fading, such as retail.

Happy Holidays from NewsForge
Most major religions have some sort of holiday during this season, and in countries that use the Gregorian calendar many companies close down or work short hours until the current year ends and the next one begins. We, too, will be taking time off to spend with our families and friends, so NewsForge will be on a reduced posting schedule between now and January 1.

DevChannel: Webservices

Debug XSLT/XML Applications "On-the-fly"
ActiveState writes "ActiveState, a leading provider of professional tools for programmers, today announced the release of Visual XSLT 2.0 at the Microsoft Professional Developers Conference. Visual XSLT now ships with ActiveState's unique Just-in-Time (JIT) debugger, enabling developers to test XSLT code embedded in other applications or libraries built for the Microsoft .NET Framework without the need for special instrumentation or access to source code. Also new, the Visual Schema Mapper allows programmers to build transformations of XML files in an intuitive drag-and-drop interface, without writing a single line of code or employing XML schemas. In addition, Visual XSLT will support Microsoft's next major version of Visual Studio .NET, code named "Whidbey".

WebDAV servers and services
WebDAV servers come in a wide variety. Some WebDAV servers focus on collaborative authoring and file sharing in general, while others have more specific functionality exposed through WebDAV. This article is a survey WebDAV server products and services. The www.webdav.org site hosts a more up-to-date list of products supporting WebDAV.

TechBookReport reviews 'Learning XML'
TBR writes "TechBookReport reviews the new edition of Erik T. Ray's 'Learning XML' (O'Reilly). Is this a book that works as a general introduction to the topic that no developer can afford to ignore? Read the detailed review to get the verdict."

Microsoft: Tech Future Lies in Longhorn
But the real promise of Longhorn is as a powerful new platform for developers to write "Web services" -- applications that leverage Internet connectivity to automate such tasks as, say, setting up a dentist appointment. Or notifying someone via cell phone when a particular stock price drops. That vision represents a shift from Microsoft's approach to most of its past Windows upgrades, said Brent Williams, an analyst with McDonald Investments Inc.

Biferno 1.0.2
Tabasoft (http://www.tabasoft.it) announces the availability for free download of Biferno version 1.0.2 (http://www.tabasoft.it/biferno). Many bug fixes and enanchements have been added from previous version (see Release notes). Biferno is a new object-oriented, HTML embedded, scripting language for web development. The high-level built-in classes, with their methods and properties, make the code very clean and easy to mantain. Biferno is an open-source, cross-platform project for Linux, Windows, MacOSX and Classic and with the effort of other programmers can be recompiled on other operating systems. This makes very easy to move a site created with Biferno from one system to another. Biferno has a plug-in architecture that makes the language completely extensible, allowing other developer to easley add functionality through internal and external classes. For more information please visit http://www.tabasoft.it/biferno where you can download the software, including guides, manuals and an on-line reference.

Building Web services with Domino 6
This tutorial demonstrates how to use Lotus Domino 6 for building and deploying Web services. It walks you through an example from a business scenario involving a fictitious book distributor. Using Domino Designer, you will learn how to develop a Web service as a Domino agent, create the Web service description file, and test the newly created service.

How effective is 'Effective XML'?
Anonymous Reader writes "In this follow up to the rather excellent Processing XML with Java, Elliotte Rusty Harold promises 50 specific ways to improve your XML. Unlike the Java book, this one is aimed much more at the experienced practitioner. Effective XML assumes a good working knowledge of XML, this isn't a tutorial or a introductory text at all. After an introduction in which he very clearly defines terms (element versus tag, document versus file etc), Harold dives straight in to deliver a set of best practices and guidelines to using XML in a manner that is both standards compliant and robust. However, the book has a very practical bias, and standards-purity is not seen as an end in itself."

Understanding Web Services
Web services are application functions that can be programmatically invoked over the Internet. The information that an application must have in order to programmatically invoke a Web service is given by a Web Services Description Language (WSDL) document. WSDL documents can be indexed in searchable Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration (UDDI) Business Registries so that developers and applications can locate Web services. This article describes the Service Web, outlines the key standards of SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI, and discusses new tools for developing Web services. Armed with this information, you should be able to understand how Web services can enhance your business and how you can begin developing them.

IBM: A WebSphere portal in every pot
IBM today announced an Express version of its WebSphere Portal with support for the iSeries.

Web Single Sign-on for Apache 2.0
Gary Gwin writes "Cafesoft announced today that it is now shipping web single sign-on support for the Apache 2.0 web server. The new Cams Apache 2.0 web agent enables web single sign-on security across a farm of Apache 2.0 servers and between Apache 2.0 and other web and J2EE servers such as Microsoft IIS, BEA WebLogic, IBM WebSphere, JBoss, Oracle 9iAS, and Tomcat. Cams is a secure, flexible, and affordable web single sign-on software solution that centralizes web application security control and management."We're excited to announce Cams web single sign-on support for the Apache 2.0 web server," said Gary Gwin, Cafesoft president and CEO. "We initially released Cams with support for Apache 1.3 only, but an increasing number of customers are requesting support for Apache 2.0. We're finding that popularity partially due to the inclussion of Apache 2.0 as the default web server for Red Hat. Cams now provides a security umbrella that protects web resources on Apache 2.0, Apache 1.3, Microsoft IIS, and J2EE servers, which gives us support for over 90 percent of the HTTP servers on the market."Cams makes sites more secure and manageable by centralizing application security decisions, enforcement, and management, rather than implementing security within each web application or server. This centralized approach to web security enables companies to reduce development and administration complexity and costs, while improving time-to-market, security, and user satisfaction for business enabling web projects. Cams also provides web single sign-on to eliminate the cost, risk, and pain associated with multiple user accounts and sign-ons to the same site.Cams service oriented architecture deploys into heterogeneous environments with an architecture that scales for high-volume sites. Cams provides user directory integration with industry-standard LDAP and SQL databases, including Microsoft Active Directory and LDAP v3 compliant servers. Primary product features include:     * Web single sign-on to web resourses on web and J2EE application servers     * Access control based on roles (RBAC), date/time, location, and custom rules     * Simplified and centralized security policy administration     * Security event logging, analysis, and real-time notification     * Flexible customizations via open APIs     * Cross-platform support including Windows NT/2000/2003, Linux/UNIX, and Solaris"Sites using Apache 2.0 can now benefit from the Cams security architecture, which enables companies to implement solid web application security without embedding security policy into application code," said Norbert Kuhnert, Cafesoft chief technology officer and founder. "Whether an Apache 2.0 server is hosting static documents, dynamic web applications including PHP, Perl, cgi-bin, mod_jk, or other scripted content, or proxying HTTP requests to other web servers, Cams provides the security foundation required to authenticate users, enforce a site-wide security policy, and provide trustworthy web single sign-on."The Cams Apache 2.0 web agent is available immediately for Apache 2.0.40 and 2.0.47 on Red Hat Linux. Other versions of Linux may also work. A free Cams Tour download is available on Cafesoft's web site at http://www.cafesoft.com. The Cams Tour is the best way to learn about Cams terminology, architecture, and web application security in general. Cams software licenses are available starting at $2,995 per server. Evaluation licenses, which include access to the Cams Apache 2.0 web agent, are available upon request.Cafesoft develops and markets Cams, which is a secure, flexible, and affordable web single sign-on software solution. Businesses around the world use Cams to give employees, customers, and partners secure access to protected web applications and resources. By using Cams, customers: 1) improve time-to-market; 2) reduce development, support, and training costs; 3) enable secure business relationships; 4) improve security compliance and accountability; and, 5) simplify security implementation and management. Headquartered in San Diego, California, Cafesoft is a private company founded in March of 1996. More information can be found at http://www.cafesoft.com."

DevChannel: Development Tools
Building dynamic Web sites with WebSphere Studio
This tutorial illustrates how to develop a Web application using Java servlets and JavaServer Pages (JSP), how to organize code in a project within the Site Developer configuration of WebSphere Studio, and how to use Java servlets and JSP to generate dynamic HTML content. It also shows how to test and debug code within WebSphere Studio and how to package a Web application for deployment on WebSphere Application Server.

GCC status update
After checking out the GCC-CVS code I had some unresolved questions. I was able to get in touch with Mark Mitchell, GCC's release manager, to learn some of the answers. A new C++ parser went into GCC a while ago and I had wanted to test whether there were noticable (or any) differences in speed. Mark reported he doesn't think it is notably slower than the previous implementation, but speed was not the initial implementation goal, correctness was. Some speed-up-related code has been committed and there is always more to be done in that department.

Java language essentials
This tutorial introduces the Java programming language. It includes examples that demonstrate the syntax of the language in an object-oriented framework, along with standard programming practices such as defining instance methods, working with the built-in data types, creating user-defined data types, and working with reference variables.

Linux: Debating devfs and udev
A recent posting to the lkml suggested that the udev project has unfairly hijacked the devfs project, leading into yet another lengthy discussion comparing udev to devfs, and questioning why the latter has been deprecated. Linux devfs was written by Richard Gooch and merged into the 2.3.46 kernel in February of 2000. Since that time, Richard has stopped maintaining it, though a number of issues remain. During the 2.5 release cycle others such as Andrey Borzenkov have contributed fixes, though problems evidently remain with the actual design.

A J2EE overview
Java has become widely accepted not only as the Web-programming model but also as the strategic programming technology for almost all enterprises. Java cornerstone Web server interfaces -- JavaServer pages and servlets -- are available on almost every platform from Sun Microsystems, to BEA Systems, to Oracle, to IBM. They are available via open source license through the Jakarta project for any Apache Web server.

Interview with a Qtopia developer
I recently had the privilege of interviewing Ian Walters, one of the Qtopia developers who has been working for Qtopia for 3 years now, mostly concentrated in PIM application's backends. We talked about what Qtopia is, its goals, and what the project developers focus on. What follows is a transcript of the interview.

Cross-platform Make
In an article about the GNU Build System I discussed how the Automake and Autoconf programs can be used to make your application more portable. Another tool capable of doing the same job is a program called CMake, the cross-platform, open-source make system. If you have not done so already, read the Autotools vs. CMake article in which Andy Cedilnik answers a few questions I put to him.

CGIScripter 1.62 released for Linux
David Simpson writes "CGIScripter 1.62 Enterprise Edition from .com Solutions Inc. ($50) has been updated to generate Perl CGI scripts for Access and SQL Server databases. Version 1.62 also adds the capability of accessing Microsoft Access and Microsoft SQL Server databases without the expense of licensing ODBC drivers for Apache web servers running on Linux. This update is free for existing CGIScripter Enterprise Edition customers. The new demo version of CGIScripter is now completely functional for generating Perl CGI scripts and saving configuration files, allowing developers to fully test the generated scripts for their intended application. For more info please see: www.cgiscripter.net"

New Standard for Tcl Programming Tools Now Available
ActiveState writes "ActiveState, a leading provider of professional tools for programmers, today announced the release of Tcl Dev Kit 3.0, with a series of powerful new features for the rapid development and delivery of professional quality Tcl applications on a range of platforms. The advanced suite of tools for Tcl sets a new bar for developer productivity and performance for in-depth code analysis, management, debugging, and deployment.

Autotools vs. CMake
CMake is a project that aims at being a replacement for the GNU Build System (Autoconf, Automake and friends). I asked Andy Cedilnik, one of CMake's core developers, a few questions about the project's philosophies.

DevChannel: Hardware

AMD Opteron Reviewed Linux Style!
Back in April of this year (April 22, 2003), AMD finally announced their much anticipated Opteron processor which ushered in the beginning of the affordable 64-bit computing age on mainstream servers and workstations. At that time, AMD released the Opteron 240, 242, and 244 processors for 2-way servers. From there, AMD had plans laid out to release 8-way and 1-way processors for servers over the next several months. At time of release, no workstation motherboards for Opteron processors could be found or, at the very least, they were extremely rare. Finally, around August, we saw the emergence of the first mass-production boards from Tyan and MSI in the form of the Thunder K8W (S2885) and K8T Master2-FAR respectively. We finally had choices for Opteron workstations and could seriously take a look at how an AMD workstation would perform under our favorite OS, Linux. This review takes a look at the Opteron processor and how it performs under Linux in 32-bit mode and even touches 64-bit on the desktop. Included in this workstation review, you'll find featured hardware from Tyan, NVIDIA, and Corsair. It's time to see what AMD has in store for the future and pit the Opteron against the previous workstation leader, the Intel Xeon at 3.2GHz.

Open Source NDIS Wrapper Supports Centrino WLAN
Werner Heuser writes "The ndiswrapper by Pontus Fuchs finally supports the WLAN chipset used in Intel's Centrino technology. So besides DriverLoader a commercial solution by Linuxant there is now a GPLed driver available. Both solutions provide also support for other chipsets (Atheros, BroadCom and more). They are based on a technique, which puts a wrapper around the appropriate Microsoft-Windows NDIS driver. See TuxMobil for more details about Linux on laptops based on Intel's Centrino(TM) technology."

Mini-ITX P4M motherboard goes to 1700MHz and beyond
Taiwanese industrial computer board supplier Commell has pushed the speed envelope for the compact Mini-ITX mini motherboard form-factor, with the release of its lastest Mini-ITX board that supports Intel's mobile Pentium 4 processors at clock rates in excess of 1700 MHz.

Programmable SOCs gains Linux RTOS, tools support
Citing heavy customer demand for embedded Linux, QuickLogic Corp. says it has partnered with TimeSys to offer ready-to-run Linux RTOS software development kits (SDKs) for its QuickMIPS family of programmable system-on-chip (SOC) processors. The QuickMIPS SOCs target networking, communications, telecom, and industrial control applications. The TimeSys Linux RTOS Professional Edition SDKs for QuickMIPS include a real-time Linux distribution for QuickLogic's QuickMIPS chips, along with TimeSys's eclipse-based TimeStorm graphical Integrated Development Environment (IDE) and TimeTrace diagnostic tool.

Embedded Linux distribution boots from USB thumb drive
Linux Mobile System (LMS) is an implementation of embedded Linux for USB "thumb" drives that can boot most any x86 computer into a Linux environment. Unlike so-called "live CDs," LMS allows files to be stored and information exchanged between systems. An an optional boot floppy is also available, for systems' whose BIOS can't boot from a USB device. According to LMS co-founder Javi Roman Espinar, Linux Mobile System's (LMS) is aimed at the development of specific tasks such as network administration, security analysis of networks, and recovery and repair of host data. "The main idea is to carry all the potency of Linux and our tools in our own pockets, ready to be used," said Espinar.

ASUS updates AMD motherboard with WiFi
ASUSTeK Computer Inc. (ASUS), the worldwide leader of motherboards, yesterday introduced the A7N8X-E Deluxe motherboard, the latest addition to the award-winning A7N8X series. The A7N8X-E Deluxe incorporated the exclusive Wi-Fi slot for IEEE 802.11b wireless networking and Gigabit LAN for high-speed Ethernet. Taipei, Taiwan, December 10, 2003 ASUSTeK Computer Inc. (ASUS), the worldwide leader of motherboards, today introduced the A7N8X-E Deluxe motherboard, the latest addition to the award-winning A7N8X series. The A7N8X-E Deluxe incorporated the exclusive Wi-Fi slot for IEEE 802.11b wireless networking and Gigabit LAN for high-speed Ethernet.

Tiny embedded Linux STB sprouts new interfaces
Set-top box (STB) vendor Amino has added a new model to its line of incredibly small embedded Linux powered STBs for IP television (IPTV). The AmiNet110 resembles the AmiNet100 model we reported on in October, but adds a number of new interfaces. Amino markets its STBs to IPTV and video-on-demand (VOD) broadcasters around the world. Like the AmiNet100, the 110 model is powered by a Linux system running on a circuit board that's just 2.9 x 2.9 inches (75 x 75 mm) in size. Like the 100, the 110 offers Ethernet input and flexible audio/video output. However, the 110 offers additional features, including an RF modulator output, RGB and S-Video output, S/P-DIF digital audio output, and a USB interface.

Linux hardware review: Biostar iDEQ 200V Cube
Anonymous Reader writes "If you're looking to build a small form factor Linux system that uses the excellent AMD XP 2500+ Barton chip, you might want to look at one of the new Biostar iDEQ barebones aluminum cube systems. Librenix recently took a look at the cheapest Socket A iDEQ, the Biostar iDEQ 200V Cube. Already installed are all the cables you need for an IDE system, prerouted, labeled and cut to exact length. The cables snake around the chassis so cleanly that they are barely visible. The cables are labeled in easy-to-read lettering on sturdy pull-tabs. This is a very well-organized and uncluttered system."

Introduction to developing handheld applications for Qtopia
Qtopia is a graphical environment for embedded devices such as the Sharp Zaurus PDA. Qtopia is written in C++ and built using Trolltech's cross-platform Qt Embedded toolkit. It runs on many processors, including StrongArm, Xscale, and MIPS, among others. You can develop applications for Qtopia on Linux (using an integrated development environment (IDE) such as KDevelop), FreeBSD, Windows (using Metrowerk's CodeWarrior for Zaurus), and Mac OS X. If you are the adventurous type, you can compile everything yourself using Linux or Cygwin on Windows -- even the cross-compiler!

Introducing the Intel Mobile Application Architecture Guide
Anonymous Reader writes "This article by a technical marketing engineer in Intel's Software Solutions Group introduces Intel's Mobile Application Architecture Guide, which was created to help application developers understand the issues that are arising through the growing proliferation of wireless mobile computing devices."

DevChannel: High Perfromance Computing

Supercomputing, Built Super Fast
Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols writes "A research team uses Sun hardware and open source Rocks Cluster Management software to create one of the fastest computers in the world in just 2 hours. eWEEK talks to the builders."

Parecel Cyclone Cluster Giveaway
Ken Farmer writes "Paracel, Inc., in association with LinuxHPC.org, is giving away an AMD Opteron(TM) cluster. The cluster will include two AMD Opteron(TM) based nodes, each with 2 GB memory and 60 GB hard drive, and SuSE Enterprise Edition 8 operating system. This cluster will be granted to an educational, government or commercial organization or research project in the United States."

Inside IBM's BlueGene/L supercomputer
Anonymous Reader writes "This article at LinuxDevices takes a look inside IBM's BlueGene/L supercomputer, which makes extensive use of Linux and embedded system-on-chip (SoC) technology to create what IBM expects to be the most powerful computer ever built. The BlueGene/L system will scale to 128,000 processors and deliver 360 teraFLOPS (trillion floating-point operations per second), all at considerably lower expense, power, and space consumption than conventional supercomputers, according to IBM. The project is jointly funded by IBM and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and is not expected to be completed until late 2004. However, a prototype is already operational. The LinuxDevices article includes a 22-page whitepaper written by BlueGene/L team scientists."

Linux clusters getting more mainstream
Clustering technology can be a relatively cost-effective way of bringing high-performance computing into an enterprise that needs to perform large and complex calculations and transactions. Networking Intel-based Linux servers, which scale exponentially, serves budget-strapped enterprises very well. In this interview, Eric Pitcher, Linux Networx's vice president of product marketing, talks about where Linux clusters fit in the enterprise, the kind of company that should consider this type of investment, and the challenges of managing Linux clusters. Clusters are mostly used in scientific and engineering circles right now. How can the technology be used in the enterprise?

Paracel Announces Paracel Cyclone Linux cluster
PHOENIX, AZ - November 18, 2003 - Paracel, Inc.®, a business unit of the Celera Genomics Group of Applera Corporation and a leading provider of applied high-performance computing solutions, today announced the general availability of Paracel CycloneTM, a new turnkey Linux cluster system. A fully integrated solution, the Paracel Cyclone delivers outstanding reliability and performance at a very competitive price. The system is tremendously flexible, making it suitable for a wide range of computationally demanding applications. Paracel will be demonstrating Cyclone at Booth #534 at SuperComputing 2003, November 18-20 (http://www.sc-conference.org/sc2003/ ). "Paracel is pleased to extend its line of high-performance computing offerings with the Paracel Cyclone," said Joe Borkowski, vice president of product management at Paracel. "Our experience providing integrated systems for computationally demanding applications in life science research and text analysis gives us the unique ability to provide solutions suited for solving real-world problems."

Linux clusters join supercomputer Top 10
Two Linux cluster systems are among the 10 fastest supercomputers in the world, according to rankings. The Los Alamos National Laboratory 'Lightning' system, designed by Linux Networx, which is capable of performing 8.05 trillion operations per second, ranks as the sixth fastest supercomputer in the world, according to the Top500 Supercomputer Sites ranking list.

IBM revs Blue Gene Supercomputer
IBM this week offered a preview of its upcoming Blue Gene/L supercomputer, a working prototype the size of a 30-inch television but capable of supporting 512 nodes. Taking up just a half-rack of space, the unit has a peak performance of 2 teraflops and has a sustained performance of 1.4 teraflops. The prototype requires no more power than what is available in a typical home, according to an IBM spokesman. The full-blown version of Blue Gene/L, scheduled to be delivered to the Lawrence Livermore Labs in 2005, will support 65,000 nodes in a 64-rack configuration and reportedly will have a peak performance of 360 teraflops.

World`s Fastest 64-bit Compilers for Linux Clusters
On November 18, PathScale will announce a suite of high-performance compilers for the AMD Opteron™ processor. PathScale compilers leverage the Opteron’s high-performance 64-bit functionality and remarkable industry-leading price/performance benefits. Initial benchmarks on real application code and submitted SPEC results show that the PathScale Compiler Suite is the highest performance compiler for 64-bit Linux-based Opteron servers. According to analysts, the market need is clear for a balanced, high-performance 64-bit, fully-supported Opteron compiler. There is very strong HPC end-user interest in AMD Opteron-based servers. The added performance of the PathScale Compiler Suite will increase this interest and make Opteron the preferred choice for Linux cluster servers, altering the balance of power in the competition between AMD and Intel in the high-performance 64-bit market. The PathScale compiler suite is based on stable, mature technology developed over a ten-year period by SGI, generally considered to be one of the most advanced 64-bit compiler code bases in the industry. The PathScale compiler development team is led by Dr. Fred Chow, formerly chief scientist at SGI, and recognized as one of the world’s leading authorities on compiler technology. In both floating point and integer-intensive performance benchmarks, PathScale compilers substantially out-performed competitive compiler offerings. Unlike other compilers that provide optimization for either floating point or integer (but not both), PathScale compilers deliver balanced performance results for floating point and integer computations as measured by SPEC and real applications codes.

IBM bolsters database for handhelds
IBM is extending its DB2 Everyplace database for handheld devices by adapting it for .Net development and offering a special version for small to midsize businesses. The database commonly is used for embedded applications such as sales force automation and medical and retail systems. It runs on devices such as PalmOS, Pocket PC or Symbian units. Version 8 of the product, which is shipping on Tuesday, features interfaces to the Microsoft .Net Framework and .Net Compact Framework.These interfaces simplify mobile application development on Windows workstations and servers or Windows mobile devices and Pocket PC systems, according to IBM.

Linux perfect for grid computing, says Oracle
Peter Perregaard, Oracle regional enterprise VP, says computer grids are likely to comprise a variety of operating systems in the foreseeable future, but Linux is the smart option for grid computing.Oracle's definition of enterprise grid computing, where small servers are used to act as one large computer, means the same operating system must be used for each level of servers in the grid, explains Perregaard.

freshmeat: Themes

MacOS Cursors 0.3
A set of MacOS cursors for XFree86.
GTK2Step 1.1
A Nextstep-like theme.
CleanIce 1.2.8
A simplistic GTK+ 2.x theme engine.

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